Wing-Chun-shaolin-master

Wing Chun (Yongchun)

Wing-Chun-shaolin-master

Wing Chun (Yongchun)

Wing Chun (Wing Tsun or Yong Chun) is a splendid Chinese internal southern kung fu style. It is said Wing Chun was created by a female Shaolin Master called Wu Mei. She was also a great master in Shaolin white crane style. In Qing Dynasty (1644—1911), the Southern Shaolin Temple was set on fire by the government. Five great Shaolin Martial Artists (Wu Mei, Zhi Shan, Bai Mei, Feng Dao De and Miao Xian) managed to fight the enemy and escape. In order to avoid the Persecution for the government, Wu Mei hid in the DaLiang Mountain, which is situated on the boarder of Sichuan and Yunnan provinces. In this duration, she kept practicing Kung fu. Occasionally she saw a snake and crane fight which enlightened her, so that she created her own unique style on this basis. Later on, she passed this style to Yan Yong Chun (Yim Wing Chun). After Wing Chun gained this, she systematized it and widely spread the form. Then people named this style Wing Chun to memorize her.

Wing Chun trains the awareness of one’s own body movement derived from muscular, tendon, and articular sources. A correct Wing Chun stance is like a piece of bamboo, firm but flexible, rooted but yielding. This structure is used to either deflect external forces or redirect them. Wing Chun favors a high, narrow stance with the elbows kept close to the body. Within the stance, arms are positioned across the vitals of the center line. Shifting or turning within a stance is carried out on the heels, balls, or middle of the foot depending on lineage. All attacks and counter-attacks are initiated from this firm, stable base.

Wing Chun features: steady stances, generation of forces, three tricks with six forces, fists playing close to one’s own body, usage of explosive power, stressing on real combat, focusing on completion of movements, combination of offence and defense by forcing up or crushing down the fists or feet from the opposing side. This style of Chuan emphasizes speed of play, keeping fists and feet close to one’s body for better protection, as well as to prepare for attacks and fighting the opponent at close range. When fighting, Yongchun boxers contain their chest, arch the back, close their elbows and knees, draw in their ribs, keep their thighs closed to protect the groin. When they use their feet for attack, they must also use their hands in cooperation. When they kick they do not expose their groin and when they deliver fist blows, their hands do not leave the front of their body.

What’s commonly seen are six Wing Chun forms: three empty hand forms, one “wooden dummy” form, and two weapons forms.

  • Siu Nim Tao 小念头; means “little idea” or “little imagination”.
  • Chum Kiu 寻桥; means “seeking the bridge”. Alternately “sinking bridge”.
  • Biu Tze 镖指; “darting fingers”.
  • Muk Yan Jong 木人桩; “wooden dummy”
  • Baat Jaam Do 八斩刀; means “Eight Chopping/Slashing Knives“.
  • Luk Dim Boon Gwun 六点半棍; means”Six and A Half Point Pole”.

Read much more about the history of Wing Chun and Wing Chun at the academy »

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