Liang-Yi-shaolin-master

Liang Yi

Liang-Yi-shaolin-master

Liang Yi

Liang Yi Quan is also known as Tai Yi Quan. The term ‘Liang Yi’, when literally translated, means ‘chaos’. Liang Yi is thus based on the notion of that which existed in the universe before the yin-yang balance of complementary forces came into being. Hence, while the yin-yang balance is normally represented by the Tai Ji, the chaos which existed before this balance came into being is reflected in the Liang Yi symbol, in which yin and yang sit part. As Liang Yi Quan combines fast and slow, soft and hard, and Yin and Yang, it is called the Two Extremes.
In appearance and style, Liang Yi Quan has been referred to as a ‘fast Tai Ji Quan’.It is a decisive, dominating and efficient form of Wushu which allows a knowledgeable practitioner to disable an opponent quickly and effectively. Whilst its physical origins are to be found in a combination of Tai Ji and Baguazhang, the theoretical and philosophical basis of the Liang Yi pressure point system lies in a combination of traditional Chinese medicine and the ‘Book of Changes’ (an ancient text which forms part of the basis for traditional Chinese beliefs).

Pressure point is one of the most important parts of Liang Yi Quan. Liang Yi Quan is an internal style of kung-fu originating in ancient China, with roots in traditional Chinese medicine. Pressure point is based on the theories of yin (negative) and yang (positive), and of the five external elements, which are metal, wood, water, fire, and earth. Besides the Liang Yi Quan pressure point system, all Kung Fu styles based on pressure points have been lost.

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